web application

KeyListener works in Applet but not in JApplet

Following scenario: A simple Applet implementing the KeyListener <code> public class AppletMain extends Applet implements KeyListener{ } </code> Therefore you have to override following methods: <code> public void keyPressed(KeyEvent k) { } public void keyReleased(KeyEvent k) { } public void keyTyped(KeyEvent k) { System.out.println("A key has been typed"); } </code> This works perfectly, unfortunatly if I change it to a JApplet the Keys are not recognized anymore

Reload Properties File (via ResourceBundle)

The Problem can be reproduced by doing following steps: 1. Step.: Loading a Properties File via ResourceBundle rb = ResourceBundle.getBundle("file.properties"); 2. Step.: Changing/Adding values to the properties file and saving it. 3. Step.: Accessing/Reading the properties file again. Step 3 is not trivial as ResourceBundle keeps the properties file cached. Therefore you can't access the new values of the properties file. Though there is a function "rb.clearCache()" which should do excatly what I want it does not! work. Therefore a workaround is needed.

Preventing SQL-Injection in a Java application

Sql-Injection is a technique to inject (or execute) SQL commands within an application (database). It is mainly used to gain access to a databases content for which one has no authorization. The method injects SQL commands by providing input to a SQL statement which contains SQL meta-characters. Example statement: <strong>select * from user where username='input'</strong> SQL injected input:<strong>user' OR '1'='1</strong> The final statement:<strong>select * from user where username='user' OR '1'='1'</strong> Since 1 always equals 1, this statement would return all the users in the database! Depending on the SQL command, an attacker could insert, modify, extract and delete data in the database.

Securing a service using WS-Security

<p>We have an existing Web-Service accessible to everyone who knows the address of the endpoint. The software used on the server:</p><ul><li>Java 6</li><li>Apache CXF 2.2.3</li><li>SOAP Webservice</li></ul><p>Because of massive abuse in the past the access should be limited to authorized people only. The login credentials are stored in a database and should be checked with every request made on the service. The login data should be transmitted in the SOAP-Envelope header and an interceptor should&nbsp; verify the data before the actual invocation of a webservice method. The solution should be based on an open standard which is well defined.</p>

Improving User Interaction on Web Applications

Indeed, tradtional web apps make use of XHTML and CSS, but this is only an attempt to inscrease flexibility on styling and structuring issues or no more than readability. However, concerns of user interactions are not beeing touched by these technologies. Common technologies do not deal with interactions like drag'n'drop, autosuggestion or even to quash annoying page reloads on filling forms – to name but a few. Which technologies are able to face this issues adequately, without reinventing the wheel nor requiring exotic and/or proprietary plugins.

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